Delilah W. Pierce Recent Highlights

Congressional & State Department Record

CONGRESSIONAL TRIBUTE TO SIX WASHINGTON ARTISTS: HON. WALTER E. FAUNTROY

HONORABLE JOHN CONYERS HIGHLIGHTS DELILAH W. PIERCE IN EXTENSIONS OF REMARKS

DELILAH W. PIERCE FEATURED IN DEPARTMENT OF STATE’S ART IN THE EMBASSIES PROGRAM

DELILAH W. PIERCE AMONG THE FIRST ORGANIZED GROUP OF AMERICAN BLACKS TO TRAVEL TO ETHIOPIA IN 1962

DELILAH W. PIERCE EXHIBITED AT THE SECOND WORLD BLACK & AFRICAN FESTIVAL OF ARTS & CULTURE IN NIGERIA 1977

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Honorable John Conyers Highlights Delilah W. Pierce In Extensions of Remarks

“The best paintings are the semiabstract landscapes by Delilah Pierce and portraits by LeRoy Gaskin. At the other end of the spectrum is a painting of Amy Carter dcing a dance routine with her former classmates at the Stevens School, their tutus made of real seashells which have been glued to the canvas.”

On Page 15090 https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/GPO-CRECB-1979-pt12/pdf/GPO-CRECB-1979-pt12-3-2.pdf

Congressional Tribute To Six Washington Artists: Hon. Walter E. Fauntroy

HON. WALTER E. FAUNTROY

OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Wednesday, May 11, 1983

Mr. FAUNTROY. Mr. Speaker, a major review of the works of six Washington artists-painters Richard Dempsey, Lois Jones, Delilah Pierce, James Porter, Alma Thomas, and graphic artist James Wells, held at the Evans-Tibbs Collection is taking place this spring. Located at 1910 Vermont Avenue NW., the Evans-Tibbs Collection is a nonprofit tax-exempt organization primarily formed to preserve and exhibit works of art by and bibliographic material on African American artists. Located one-half block south of Washington, D.C.’s historic U Street corridor, the museum and research center are currently housed where Lillian Evans Tibbs lived. As an internationally acclaimed lyric soprano known professionally as Madame Evanti, Mrs. Tibbs sponsored many artists and art activities during her life. The six Washington masters exhibition is one of many such activities held by the collection in continuance of that tradition.

…Born in Washington, D.C., Delilah Pierce studied at Howard in the late 1930’s with James Porter. In 1962 Pierce received an Agnes Meyer Fellowship to study and travel in several African countries. The realities of an American of part African ancestry visiting Africa was significant for it not only represented links to ethnicity in a historical sense, it provided for Pierce an opportunity to become one of a handful of African-American artists to travel to Africa and to do so before it became popular in the late 1960’s. Continue reading on page 12016 (GPO-CRECB-1983).

Congressional Tribute To Delilah W. Pierce

Quick Link: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/GPO-CRECB-1983-pt9/pdf/GPO-CRECB-1983-pt9-5-3.pdf

Chesapeake Collectibles’ Segment On Delilah W. Pierce Is Fabulous!

In March of 2020, the producer of MPT’s Chesapeake Collectibles contacted the family of Delilah W. Pierce for an image and deeper context. COVID-19 Pandemic hit and the show didn’t air on March 23rd; rather, it aired on August 3rd & 4th. The show was and is fabulous and worth watching. The segment was a great highlight for Delilah W. Pierce, her collection, and her advocacy. Her art pieces appraised for $20,000 to $30,000 on the show.

Please watch the episode: Chesapeake Collectables

Delilah & Joe Pierce House Reservations Refunded Due To COVID-19 Pandemic

Washington, DC/Oak Bluffs, MA, March 24, 2020: As a family, we’ve made the choice to put people over money and refund all reservations to the Delilah & Joe Pierce House this summer (2020). The loss of our summer income will be felt. But the disruption of a small eco-system would be worse. Gov. Charlie Baker asks that those of us with second homes remain off-island. Due to his directive, we are also doing our part in keeping summer vacationers off-island to protect the people. This was not a choice we took lightly as we had to disappoint many ready to enjoy all that the island has to offer. However, the hard-working laborers, educators, merchants, farmers, fishermen, firemen, officers, healthcare professionals, and business owners who make the island home year-round are far too important to the eco-system. We have to protect them and their children! Yes – This is more important than money! God speed!

Please remain safe and distant from your neighbors!

Visit: Delilah & Joe Pierce House

Best Wishes,

Spence & McDow Family

As Seen on:

LION OF THE ANACOSTIA MUSEUM [Washington Post] 1989

Since moving to its new location in 1986, the museum has mounted exhibits encompassing both art and cultural history, such as “Inspiration: 1961-1989,” which featured the work of such local African American artists as James Lesesne Wells, Delilah W. Pierce and the late Alma Thomas, and the current exhibit, “The Real McCoy: African American Invention and Innovation,” which examines the contributions of blacks to industry and technology, curated by the museum’s resident historian, Portia James. Read more: Lion Of The Anacostia Museum

Delilah W. Pierce Featured In Department of State’s Art In The Embassies Program

 

Transcript from Department of State Newsletter:

Paintings by Black American Artists Are Going to Africa

The Department’s Art in the Embassies Program is sending a group of paintings by Black American artists to Africa. The collection will be exhibited in the US Embassy Residence of Ambassador Beverly Carter in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. It will remain in Africa for at least two years. The paintings were assembled at Ambassador Carter’s request by Mrs. Llewellyn E. Thompson, Director of the Art in the Embassies Program, in cooperation with Adolphus Ealey, Director of The Barnett Aden Gallery and Fine Arts Coordinator of the District of Columbia School System. Through programs of this kind, the Department hopes to further the exposure of Afro American art abroad. Mr. Ealey believes that it is necessary that Afro American artists direct their art towards a world culture instead of limiting its circulation to the United States. Commenting on the collection, Mr. Ealey said,

“The artists on exhibit vary in period and styles as well as age and techniques. Each work comprehends various and sundry experiences and modes of expressions. They offer no cause to plead or interest to serve only to translate in visual form the shared emotions and ideas basic to all mankind.”

Represented in the collection are the following artists, David C Driskell, Adolphus Ealey,  Sam Gillium,  Lois Jones, Norman Lewis, Lloyd McNeill Jr., Delilah W. Pierce, James S. Porter, Merton D. Simpson, Carroll Sockwell, Lou Stovall, Alma W. Thomas, Larry Erskine Thomas, Laura Waring, James L. Wells, and Franklin White Jr.

AT PREVlEW: Mrs. William P. Rogers (right) chats with artists Adolphus Ealey (left) and Alma Thomas at a preview of the paintings by Black American artists which will be sent to Africa by the Arts in the Embassies Program. EXHIBIT Among the paintings presented in the collection are left to right Rose of Charm (oil) by Laura Wheeler Waring, Maine Island (oil) by David Driskell (below), Peasants on Parade Haiti (oil) by Lois Jones, Guardian of the Shore (oil) by Delilah W. Pierce, Liberation (silk screen) by Lloyd McNeill Jr., untitled abstract by Carroll Sockwell (below) and Snoopy Sees A Glimpse of Jupiter (an acrylic) by Alma Thomas. APRIL 1973 45

Click To Read Full State Department Newsletter

Download PDF: Delilah W Pierce In Department_of_State_News_Letter

Delilah W. Pierce Featured In CALLALOO

Delilah W. Pierce is recently featured in CALLALOO – DC and MD In The History Of American Art. CALLALOO is a journal of African Diaspora Arts and Letters, founded in 1976 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. It is currently published by The Johns Hopkins University Press. The Editor is Charles Henry Rowell and features the most prominent African American artists in history. From Delilah’s friends Lois Mailou Jones and Alma Thomas to James Porter, this literary and arts canon is a must read!

 

CALLALOO – Volume 39, Number 5

Delilah W. Pierce Wrote: The Significance of Art Experiences In The Education Of The Negro

In Carter G. Woodson’s The Negro History Bulletin, volume XV, number 6, published in March of 1952, Delilah W. Pierce wrote:

 

Education for “our way of life” in “our times”; education for “all the people” that our way of life might be maintained; this we hear and say ever so often and, as Americans, firmly believe. We believe that our security, progress and happiness, as a democratic…

Take a moment to enjoy Delilah’s article:

The Significance Of The Art Experiences In The Education Of The Negro

 

Not Actual Cover